MAIN STREET—December 16, 2010

Forever war

 

Have you noticed that our wars just seem to go on and on? So have I, so I looked it up.

Roger Allen, publisher.

Since 1675, we have been in 26 wars. Several early ones were against Indians while we were still colonies. Then came the Revolutionary War against the British. Then, more war against the Barbary Pirates. We had the War of 1812, Texas’s fight for independence from Mexico, and the Civil War. We returned to battle in the Spanish American War. (My great uncle fought in that one.)

In 1918, we entered World War I and fought Germany. That was a particularly nasty one, but we were on the winning team.

In World War II we went up against the Germans, Italians and Japanese. Dec. 7, 1941: the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. I’m old enough to remember the day. It was a Sunday, I recall, and our family was stunned with the news. The whole country was stunned. It took about four years but, again, our team won.

Korea split into North and South, and America went to war to support the South. Fresh out of high school, I was there with the U.S. Army. We still have troops there.

We lost in Vietnam and the Bay of Pigs. We managed to win in Granada and Panama. Then—remember Bosnia?

Afghanistan and Iraq are still in progress.

Will it ever end? There must be a better solution to conflict than blowing up cities, resources and human beings. 

The good season

In the really old days, what we call “Christmas” was a celebration of the winter solstice (the sun is coming back, the sun is coming back!). The birth of Christ gave us a focus for renewal; the time of year was retained.

Eventually, of course, Santa came down the chimney and Hallmark took over. There’s something for everyone in this joyous celebration of the good things of life. Have a wonderful holiday, everyone. And peace on earth. 

Gas

Sister Mary Ann, who served at a home health agency, was out making rounds visiting homebound patients when she ran out of gas. Fortunately, a station was just a block away. She walked down the road to borrow a gas can and buy some gas.

The only gas can the station owned had been loaned out. The attendant said she could wait until it was returned, but Sister was headed to a patient’s house. She decided not to wait.

Back at the car, she looked for some kind of container and spotted the bedpan she was taking to the patient. Always resourceful, Sister Mary Ann carried the bedpan to the station, filled it with gasoline, and carried it back to her car.

As she was pouring the gas into her tank, two Baptist ladies watched from across the street. One of them turned to the other and said, “If it starts, I’m turning Catholic.” 

More on war

A dentist and a manicurist fought tooth and nail.

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