Articles by Squire News

About Squire News
The Squire has been Rockford’s free weekly newspaper since 1871. Our loyal readership includes over fifteen thousand homes in the Rockford area, including the affluent Lakes area of Lake Bella Vista, Bostwick Lake and Silver Lake; Belmont, Blythefield, as well as Algoma, Courtland, Cannon and Plainfield Townships. The Squire is distributed through the U.S. Post Office every Thursday. We also deliver to in-town businesses and homes with paper carriers and news stands in our grocery stores and over thirty local shops.

SQUIRE VACATION-And now for the rest of the story….

July 16, 2009 // 0 Comments

Sure, we could have taken a picture on the Maine lobster fishing boat the Vagabond with Captain John and his son Charlie. We could have taken a breathtaking shot from the top of a mountain with the Atlantic Ocean glimmering in the background. Instead I offer this photo of the Altena family vacation in Maine this past month to remind readers of how vacations also are. In addition to whirlwind fun and adventure, there is the packing up (note the rain), taking down the tents and settling in for the 21-hour ride home with sleeping kids in the back. Happy vacation to our readers and don’t forget to send us your Squire vacation photo at

Fall turkey application on sale now through Aug. 1

July 16, 2009 // 0 Comments

The Department of Natural Resources (DNR) reminds hunters that applications for fall turkey hunting licenses are on sale now through August 1, 2009. A total of 59,050 licenses are available through a lottery for the units open to hunting-12,350 general licenses that may be used on public or private land and 46,700 licenses for private land only. Twelve wild turkey management units totaling 34,976 square miles are open to fall turkey hunting during the October 5 to November 14 season, including most of southern Michigan, five counties in the northern Lower Peninsula, and the entire wild turkey management area in the Upper Peninsula. Regulations are virtually identical to last year. “We are in the third year of a three-year period of stabilized regulations that were developed by working with turkey-hunting groups,” explained Al Stewart, DNR upland game bird specialist. “After this season, we intend to fully evaluate the regulations and make changes where appropriate.” Hunters may apply for a turkey hunting license at any authorized license dealer, at DNR Operations Service Centers, or online at using the E-License system. The application fee is $4. Drawing results will be posted online beginning Aug. 17. If any licenses remain after the drawing, unsuccessful applicants may purchase one leftover license in person at any license dealer on a first-come, first-served basis for a one-week period beginning Aug. 24 at 10 a.m. Any licenses that remain as of Aug. 31 at 10 a.m. will be available for purchase over the counter by any hunter. The licenses will be sold until the quotas are met. The DNR is committed to the conservation, protection, management, use and enjoyment of the state’s natural resources for current and future generations.

Rockford volunteers attend Citizen’s Police Academy

July 16, 2009 // 0 Comments

Rockford Volunteer Services Unit (VSU) members recently attended the first Citizen’s Police Academy held at the MSP Training Academy in Lansing on June 26 and 27, 2009. The event was held for all Michigan Citizen Corps volunteers and included sessions on evidence collection and crime scene containment, crash reconstruction, traffic control, witness recognition and exercise, and ethics. Also included was a tour of the MSP training facility, drive track (including a “quick” ride), K-9 facility, ES team, HazMat training center and bomb squad demonstration. Meals were provided by the Salvation Army (as a training exercise for them, also). The attending members of the Rockford VSU thoroughly enjoyed the event and look forward to using the new information in serving the Rockford community.

What is kennel cough?

July 16, 2009 // 0 Comments

by SAM HYER Kennel cough is also called canine cough, bordetellosis and infectious tracheobronchitisis. Kennel cough in dogs will stimulate a coarse, dry, hacking cough about three to seven days after the dog is initially infected. It sounds as if the dog needs to “clear its throat” and the cough will be triggered by any extra activity or exercise. Many dogs that acquire kennel cough will cough every few minutes, all day long. Their general state of health and alertness will be unaffected-they usually have no rise in temperature, and do not lose their appetite. The signs of canine cough usually will last from 7 to 21 days and can be very annoying for the dog and the dog’s owners. Life-threatening cases of kennel cough are extremely rare and a vast majority of dogs that acquire the infection will recover on their own with no medication. Cough suppressants and occasionally antibiotics are the usual treatment selections. Actually, clinical cases of kennel cough are usually caused by several infectious agents working together to damage and irritate the lining of the dog’s trachea and upper bronchii. The damage to the tracheal lining is fairly superficial, but exposes nerve endings that become irritated simply by the passage of air over the damaged tracheal lining. Once the organisms are eliminated, the tracheal lining will rapidly heal. The most common organisms associated with canine cough are the bacteria called bordetella bronchiseptica, two viruses called parainfluenza virus and adenovirus, and even an organism called mycoplasma. The causative organisms can be present in the expired air of an infected dog, much the same way that human “colds” are transmitted. The airborne organisms will be carried in the air in microscopically tiny water vapor or dust particles. The airborne organisms, if inhaled by a susceptible dog, can attach to the lining of the trachea and upper airway passages, find a warm, moist surface on which to reside and replicate, and eventually damage the cells they infect. The reason this disease seems so common, and is even named “kennel” cough, is that wherever there are numbers of dogs socializing together in an enclosed environment such as a kennel, animal shelter, dog park, day care, or indoor dog show, the disease is much more likely […]

Community Endowment connects present with historic figures

July 16, 2009 // 0 Comments

This spring, The Rockford Squire reported that five historic people in the Rockford area were honored at Recognition Plaza at Peppler Park. The event is a newer tradition in its second year and organized by the Rockford Area Community Endowment (RACE). Each year, RACE will honor people from the City of Rockford and the townships of Algoma, Cannon, Courtland and Plainfield. In addition to the gift of grants, recognizing the people who have contributed significantly to the history of the area is among the Endowment’s goals. When visiting the beautiful Peppler Park Recognition Plaza (on the west side of the dam), take the time to read the names on the bricks under your feet and in plaques on the columns in the park. The following is one more of the stories of this year’s honorees, with others to follow in future issues of the Squire. Otto A. Krause Otto A. Krause was the son of G.A. Krause and a member of a family whose descendents were tanners. The family tanning business was begun in Prussia in the 1700s, although Otto was born in Ann Arbor, Mich. He was educated at the University of Michigan and was an outstanding scholar in the engineering field. Together with his father and brother Victor, they built a shoe factory in Rockford in 1903. He then became chairman of the board of Wolverine Shoe and Tanning Corporation. Following World War I, Otto initiated a profit-sharing plan at Wolverine whereby stockholders and workers would share in the company profits. This was a first-of-its-kind practice and made him renowned as among the country’s most enlightened industrialists. During the Depression years of the 1930s, Otto saw to it that the company continued production, even if it meant stockpiling shoes and suffering losses-he wanted workers to have their jobs. Otto was noted for his caring concern for his employees and for the people of Rockford. He financially-often anonymously-helped with the grocery and educational expenses of some of his employees. He helped support the churches of Rockford, although he did not belong to any of them. He was a well-known philanthropist. Otto also served as president of the Village of Rockford for several years, and was a member of the Rockford Board of Education, where […]

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