Articles by Squire News

About Squire News
The Squire has been Rockford’s free weekly newspaper since 1871. Our loyal readership includes over fifteen thousand homes in the Rockford area, including the affluent Lakes area of Lake Bella Vista, Bostwick Lake and Silver Lake; Belmont, Blythefield, as well as Algoma, Courtland, Cannon and Plainfield Townships. The Squire is distributed through the U.S. Post Office every Thursday. We also deliver to in-town businesses and homes with paper carriers and news stands in our grocery stores and over thirty local shops.

Local Bald Eagles

June 11, 2009 // 0 Comments

  Rockford photographer Michelle Wise captured this beautiful image of the local eagles we have been showing to readers the past several weeks. It is amazing for Squire staff to see how quickly the two babies have been growing.

Elderly woman killed in crash

June 11, 2009 // 0 Comments

by JUDY REED Margaret and Jerry Yakes were sitting in their family room about 7 p.m. June 3, when they heard an explosion, and then another. It was followed by sirens. What the Yakes heard was the crash at the corner of  Tefft and 13 Mile Road, in Courtland Township, that killed 87-year-old Pauline Squires, of Rockford. “It’s a nasty intersection,” noted Margaret Yakes, who lives just north of the intersection on Tefft. According to the Kent County Sheriff Department, Mrs. Squires was traveling southbound on Tefft in a Buick Roadmaster, when she failed to stop at the stop sign at 13 Mile. As she traveled through the intersection, she was struck by a westbound Ford Expedition driven by John Robinette, of Grand Rapids. Both vehicles rolled several times, with the SUV coming to rest at the southwest corner of the intersection, and the Buick in the field southwest of the intersection. Mrs. Squires was pronounced dead at the scene, and Mr. Robinette was transported to Spectrum Butterworth Hospital by Rockford Ambulance with broken ribs. Courtland Fire, Rockford Police, and Cedar Springs Police all assisted at the scene.

Birthday Donation to Locks of Love

June 11, 2009 // 0 Comments

Kamryn Roney recently turned 6 and for her birthday decided to cut her hair and donate it to Locks of Love. Kamryn just completed kindergarten at Valley View. She had her hair cut by Kara at Xscape in Rockford.

Squire on Spring break

June 11, 2009 // 0 Comments

Nick Brouwer of Comstock Park took advantage of Spring Break to fly to Tucson, Arizona and travel home with his grandparents Mac and Judy Thomas of Rockford. He was found taking a rest to read the Squire after a hike in the Florida Mountains, Rockhound State Park, Demming, New Mexico.

In Your Own Backyard – June 11, 2009

June 11, 2009 // 0 Comments

Forest tent caterpillar outbreak heavy this year Michigan is experiencing a heavy outbreak of forest tent caterpillars (FTC) this year, particularly in areas around Gaylord, Cadillac, Traverse City and Petoskey in the northern Lower Peninsula, according to the Department of Natural Resources, (DNR). Widespread outbreaks of FTC occur at intervals of 10 to 15 years. These outbreaks last for two to five years, with most running their course in two to three years.  FTC epidemics commonly begin over large areas simultaneously.  This is caused by favorable weather conditions preceding an outbreak.  Population buildups often follow periods of unusually warm, dry springs. Fortunately, FTC outbreaks eventually subside as caterpillars succumb to parasites and other insect natural enemies. Defoliation begins in early May in the northern Lower Peninsula and late May in the Upper Peninsula.  Defoliation can be dramatic and becomes noticeable by early to mid-June.  However, cool weather slows development and feeding, extending the duration of outbreaks. “Defoliation from FTC normally does little damage to the tree,” said Roger Mech, forest health specialist with the DNR. “FTC infestation will reduce the vigor of the tree, but the tree usually recovers within a few years, after FTC infestation dies down.” Mech noted that most trees will develop a second set of smaller leaves around mid-summer, after the initial loss of leaves from FTC. He added that trees rarely die from FTC infestation alone. Native flies play an important role in natural control of FTC, but fly populations tend to increase as a result, and can create another nuisance for the public. The DNR can provide technical advice to landowners and landowner groups experiencing FTC infestation. Landowners interested in technical advice should contact their nearest DNR office. Aerial applications of pesticides may help reduce caterpillar nuisance during an FTC outbreak.  Applications must be made at the appropriate time and by licensed experienced applicators.  Once caterpillars are full grown and defoliation is nearly complete, pesticides are not effective.  The DNR can help homeowners determine whether aerial spraying will be effective. When spraying is warranted, the DNR recommends the use of a biological insecticide called Bacillus thuringiensis (also known as Bt). The DNR recommends the use of Bt because of its environmental safety.  Bt is a naturally occurring bacterium that […]

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