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A Place for Every Child – Preschool Options through Rockford Public Schools

March 5, 2009 // 0 Comments

by LISA JACOBS, Executive Director Rockford Community Services Childhood is an amazing time in the life of a human. Everyday, learning is the primary activity. Preschool provides an excellent opportunity to enhance that learning. Through a preschool experience, children are better prepared to make the transition to the formal school setting. In a quality preschool, children gain self-confidence and become more independent as they develop problem-solving skills as well as learning about the reading and writing process that they will jump into in kindergarten. They also learn social skills like sharing, waiting your turn, and empathy, which help them throughout life. The Rockford Schools Childcare Services offers four different options for preschool children. Each is unique and can meet the needs of any young child. The Community Education Preschool program is at the Administration Building. This well-established family-loved program has been serving the children of Rockford for 35 years. The staff of Ruth Hosler, Melissa Young and Brenda Chrisman has many years of experience. This is a program that emphasizes school readiness and success through the teaching of cognitive and social skills. The staff develops a warm nurturing relationship with each child and his family. The Child Development Lab Preschool at the high school also has a curriculum to prepare students for kindergarten. It features a parent observation room, motivated “high school friends” who help with learning, a Paws with a Cause dog on Tuesdays and Thursdays, an art fair in the spring, a fitness day, and lots of exciting activities. Hola Amigos is a Spanish Immersion Preschool to introduce three- and four-year-old children to the Spanish language and culture. Bilingual staff teach the same academic and social skills as a traditional preschool. The Spanish words for these concepts are gradually introduced through the year, ending with a Cinco di Mayo party in May. For those children who need childcare, we offer a full-day program which incorporates a preschool into the morning, thus eliminating the need of enrolling in a preschool and a childcare. This program is also housed in the Administration Building. As a result of meeting high standards, this childcare/preschool is nationally accredited, much like the Blue Ribbon awards given to each Rockford elementary school. Registration for the three traditional part-day programs is […]


March 5, 2009 // 0 Comments

Mrs. Ruth B. Shaw, age 96, of Cedar Springs passed away on Thursday, February 26, 2009. She grew up on a farm and graduated in 1930 from Cedar Springs High School. Later she and her husband Charles had their own farm. Even as a child Ruth enjoyed working in the soil. She planted thousands of trees (to stop soil erosion and conservation), weeded the garden, and taught her grandchildren how to show respect for flowers and plants. Ruth would not leave her home unless the dishes were done. She was a wonderful seamstress and knitted many slippers and scarves that she gave to her family, church, Grand Rapids Home for Veterans, and the Dominican Republic. For many years Ruth wrote the East Nelson notes for the Cedar Springs Clipper. Ruth was a member of the East Nelson United Methodist Church for 65 years and was secretary for the MITE Society. Her family remembers the succulent taste and smell of her cinnamon rolls and her wonderful meals. For the last six years she was part of the family at Bishop Hills Elder Care Community, and Ruth especially enjoyed the many activities. She is survived by her children, Ken and Louise Shaw of Cedar Springs, Geri and Bob Winegar of Rockford, and Rosi and George Pappas of Cookeville, Tenn.; grandchildren, Kelly and Randy Longcore, Kolene and Rick Gibson, Kirk and Colleen Shaw, Kory Shaw and his fiancée Susan, Amy and Roy Ortego, Mark and Wendy Winegar, Jill and Nick Landers, Beth and Craig Brown; 19 great-grandchildren; five great-great-grandchildren; sister-in-law, Mrs. Wannetah Phelps. She was preceded in death by her husband, Charles; a brother, E.L. Phelps; and sister, Mrs. Lola Eldred. The service for Mrs. Shaw was Monday at 11:00 a.m. at East Nelson United Methodist Church with Pastor Mary Ivanov officiating. Interment was in East Nelson Cemetery. Those planning an expression of sympathy are asked to consider East Nelson United Methodist Church or Hospice of Michigan. Arrangements by Pederson Funeral Home, Rockford.

Main Street – March 5, 2009

March 5, 2009 // 0 Comments

The Taliban and those who want a radical social system are opposed to women learning to read and write. They have rather strict penalties for lots of things we think of as being normal or right for women. These guys are the real rednecks of the world and their approach to women is ludicrous (that’s a big word – if you know the meaning you are not a “redneck”). Much of the world is tending toward equal treatment of women, and we are better for it. It’s something like a balanced diet. It’s healthier! For better or worse – 1909 * The average life expectancy was 47 years. * Only 14 percent of the homes had a bathtub. * There were only 8,000 cars and only 144 miles of paved roads. * The average wage in 1908 was 22 cents per hour. * Ninety percent of all doctors had NO COLLEGE EDUCATION! Instead, they attended so-called medical schools, many of which were condemned in the press AND the government as “substandard.” * Crossword puzzles, canned beer, and iced tea hadn’t been invented yet. * There were about 230 reported murders in the ENTIRE U.S.A. Fairy tale While working for an organization that delivers lunches to elderly shut-ins, I used to take my 4-year-old daughter on my afternoon rounds. She was unfailingly intrigued by the various appliances of old age, particularly the canes, walkers and wheelchairs. One day I found her staring at a pair of false teeth soaking in a glass. As I braced myself for the inevitable barrage of questions, she merely turned and whispered, “The tooth fairy will never believe this!” Bury our problem There’s been talk of solving the problem of global warming by burying our excess CO2 in the ground. It’s not as easy as it seems. First you have to gather the gas and then stuff it into old wells and mines. Maybe it will stay there, maybe not. This stuffing is not free, either. Find the hole in the ground, get the gas to it, pump it down. We’d do better to control it before it gets into the air. Help on the way A man was driving on a lonely, mountain road in a blinding rainstorm when his […]

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