Bill Amitage

Education Blackboard

February 15, 2010 // 0 Comments

School Beat Learning with style by BILL AMITAGE, Principal Belmont Elementary School Perhaps this has happened to you. You are sitting around the dinner table with your family. Or, if you’re like my children who are now grown and parents of children themselves, you are taking your children to an after school function. The conversation usually turns to their day. You ask the time honored question, “So, what did you learn in school today”? This is usually followed by the time honored response, “Nothing”. Aside from the dynamics of parent-child relationships, in order to get a response that is more than a single word phrase, perhaps the question needs to be modified. Instead of asking what they learned in school, ask them what they enjoyed the most about school, and why.  This question encourages responses that may give you some insight about how they learn best. There are three broad categories of learners that I see often in school. First, there are students who are auditory learners. They learn best by listening and responding during instruction. They have a great auditory memory, remembering what the teacher has said and the conversations in class. They have a good control of vocabulary and language. However, they can also be easily distracted by noise in the learning environment. Second, there are students who learn best through instruction that focuses on visual cues. They learn best by seeing what is being presented. Maps, graphs, movies and pictures help them retain the information presented in class. These students may struggle if they are in a class that relies heavily on lecture. Finally, there are the kinesthetic learners. They learn by doing. They are often good at athletics. They learn best through activities that allow them to get out of their seats, move about, and interact during their learning.  t may be difficult for kinesthetic learners to sit still during lessons, and they may often appear fidgety or distracted.  All three of these learning styles are evident in the average classroom. Students are generally not exclusively one learning style over another. The task is to plan lessons that address all three of these styles. Teachers differentiate instruction so that a single concept will be presented in ways that connect with the […]