Cannon Township Board

‘Commit to Cannon’ team of seven announces candidacy for township board

July 5, 2012 // 0 Comments

A team of seven cannon township residents recently announced its candidacy for Cannon Township Board. The team consists of Dennis Smith (supervisor), Jim Alles (treasurer), Ken Carozza (clerk), and four running for trustee: Rob McBrien, Tim Nelson, Annamarie Bauer and Jim Pearson. “Running with a campaign pledge called ‘Commit to Cannon,’ our team will bring fiscal responsibility, personal accountability, transparency and integrity to our township matters,” said Tim Nelson, a pastor at Ada Bible Church. “We care deeply about preserving Cannon Township as a rural community and believe in the importance of creating timely budgets, providing good governance by having all meetings open, and not making any deals behind closed doors.” “We are unhappy with the current direction that Cannon Township is being led and are seeking a change. Our team has a strong history of trusted leadership in this community and look forward to the opportunity to serve,” said Rob McBrien, current Cannon Township trustee. McBrien pointed out that the team has 56 years of combined zoning, township or planning commission experience. Standing in together in Cannon Township, this team will begin campaigning immediately under the slogan “Commit to Cannon.”


June 14, 2012 // 0 Comments

by STEVE GRIMM Cannon Township Supervisor  The Cannon Township Board has always focused on being open and transparent in the conduct of your business. When I became supervisor in January 2011, the Board allowed public comment in the beginning of every board meeting, and every person was allowed three minutes to comment. As of my first meeting as supervisor, we added public comment at the end of each meeting and removed the time limit. I have always felt that there should be no limit in Cannon Township on free speech, and if something was important enough for someone to take the time to come to a meeting, they should not be limited in the amount of time they have. We have said, however, that if a person has five minutes of something to say, they should to do it in five minutes, not six or ten. We recently had over a hundred people at a board meeting when we were considering a revision to the Special Land Use Ordinance for recreational areas in Cannon Township, like, but not limited to, Cannonsburg Ski Area. Everyone at the meeting had an opportunity to address the Board, and everyone, without exception, had something meaningful to say. That was a very important moment for our township, because it proved that the changes I mentioned above work very, very well. Everyone was courteous and respectful, and the Board appreciated every word that was said. As a result of this exercise in representative democracy, the Board was able to glean very important information and pass our concerns on to the Planning Commission for analysis and input. The Planning Commission then appointed a subcommittee to analyze those concerns. Then a subcommittee of the Board met with representatives of the Planning Commission, and came up with a very good ordinance, as well as an amended Outdoor Assembly ordinance. Best of all, we had input and advice from interested citizens in the subcommittee as well. In Cannon Township, we realize that the collective wisdom of her residents far outweighs that of her Board. Taking things one step further, we recently changed the make-up of our sewer committee to include a board member who actually pays a sewer bill, Deb Diepenhorst, as well as residents […]

Fighting Crime

August 27, 2009 // 0 Comments

Lt. Scott Brown, Sector Commander for the Kent County Sheriff Department, updated the Cannon Township Board on Monday, August 24, on his officers efforts to reduce crime in the township. The Board voted to pay for extra patrols this summer for the hours between midnight and 4 a.m. Township Supervisor, Pete MacGregor, said the seasonal extra patrols were to stop “opportunistic” crimes such as stealing CDs from cars and beer from garages. Brown said 92-percent of the incidents officers investigated were initiated themselves rather than from people calling in. “Basically, after midnight, you have officers and people doing other things.”