Cannonsburg Grist Mill

Cannon treasure hunt for $1,000 to begin

September 16, 2010 // 0 Comments

More clues will be released this year     Hunters scouring Cannon Township for a copper coin that will give them $1,000 in free gasoline can begin looking Tuesday, September 21 when the first three of three clues each week are released. The Cannon Area Business Association (CABA) is again holding the annual treasure hunt in the memory of the township’s namesake cannon, hidden by township fathers after it fatally killed one man who was shooting it off as a prank. Today the hunt for the “cannon”—in the guise of a copper coin with the image of the cannon on one side—is worth big money, one thousand dollars in free gas to the hunter who first discovers its hiding place. “I run into people all the time from all over,” said the keeper of the coin’s hiding spot, Carl Stites of Stites Eye Care. “They tell me they love to look for the coin and do it as a family every year.” Stites said the local hunt—it is always within the boundaries of Cannon Township—has expanded its following to quite a distance. The hunt is in its fifth year and rules remain the same. The coin is located on public property, is not more than four feet off the ground, and must be turned in after being found. Clues are released each Tuesday beginning on September 21, and are available at the shops or websites of the participating businesses. Organizers have divided up the clues so that hunters must visit more than one place to find all three clues. For those who are “armchair hunters,” each Thursday edition of the Squire will have the clues of that week on the front page. “People are lined up outside the bank in the morning waiting for us to open,” said organizer Linda Anderson of ChoiceOne Bank on Belding Road. She said other participating businesses have the same experience and people sometimes make the mistake of searching the brush and landscaping of the businesses hoping to find the coin. That’s great fun, and “hunter” sightings are often called in to the Squire so a reporter can run out and interview hunters. However, the coin is never hidden on private property, so searching in the gutter of any of […]

How a village was built

July 2, 2009 // 0 Comments

The 25-year story of Honeycreek Inn and Cannonsburg “There were two wars going on. There was an oil embargo. We were in a recession. Our president had just resigned and a new one was coming on board,” said Don Kurylowicz of his first days in the Village of Cannonsburg. “So, things have changed a lot in 25 years, but things also haven’t changed a lot.” Kurylowicz is reflecting back on a 25-year journey he has taken with his community. Kurylowicz could be called the “King of Cannonsburg,” as he owns lots of it-every commercial property that faces the road. His properties include the Honeycreek Inn, the Cannonsburg Grist Mill, the gas station, and the Cannonsburg Market. He doesn’t see it that way. “I’m so blessed. I’m so grateful,” he insists. “You know the show Cheers, where everyone knows your name? Here, everyone knows your name, but they also look out for each other and take care of each other.” As an example, Kurylowicz pointed out a tragic death last year of a young waitress at the Honeycreek. Just 30 years old, she left behind her family, including young children. The community had a fundraiser for her and collected $38,000. When Kurylowicz began his long relationship with the people of Cannonsburg, things were different. Twenty five years ago there wasn’t a lot going on there. There was Townsend Park, a real gem of a recreation area. Besides that, there was a restaurant in a 125-year-old building in poor condition. The original town had burned in the big fire of April 10, 1889, “completely destroying the business district,” according to the Cannon Township Historical Society history book. Kurylowicz was a 30-year-old man with a desire to work for himself. With degrees in sociology, urban planning and architecture, Kurylowicz saw the state of the country and didn’t think architecture would be a profitable career for quite some time. He worked a few years in the mental health field and didn’t want to go back. Back then, no one used the term “flipping” houses, but he had done just that and had about $15,000 to his name-enough for the down payment on the Honeycreek building that was operating as a bar. “The only people who went there were bikers, […]

Sick of Gloom and Doom? Rockford Reports Positive News

February 26, 2009 // 0 Comments

by BETH ALTENA We need to get over our pride and ego and get on with our lives, Frenz Coffehouse owner Rich Zeck believes. He is one of many local businesess people who haven’t bought into the news that we are going through the worst of times. “I can speak for myself because I have lost my job,” he said of a former high-paying career. Zeck opened his own shop after the job loss and also works another part-time job. Zeck said he believes Americans have allowed their financial fear to dominate their lives and this has made things worse. “What if there were no newspapers and no televisions? The economy ”d go about our business and have a life.” He believes the stockmarket slumps follow each dire news report as people hunker down, afraid to spend money and get on with things. Zeck, who is also a college professor, said he understands the economy is a hot topic and his students want to discuss it at length. “It’s such an emotional issue,” he said. Zeck believes there is plenty of good to be learned and practiced in tough times. He said friends, neighbors and families helped each other out to make it through the Depression. We should take a page from that chapter of history. “I knew we were in big trouble when people came in worried about the cost of a barrel of oil and gold,” he said. “That makes no difference to most people.” Putting hope in corporations and companies rather than in people is part of the error behind economic troubles. “Two hundred years ago you were a seamstress and I was a farmer,” he said. “We helped each other out and did business together.” Doing this today is what we should be doing, Zech believes. As a coffee shop owner, he has sent customers to the other coffee shops in town. “Too often it’s ‘Me, me, me.’ It’s not me, it’s just us.” He is a firm believer in paying it forward. “If we all took the time to help someone else out, what would that do?” he asked. Zeck gave the example of people who have lost their jobs. “Get out and volunteer,” he said. “People lose their jobs, […]