Cash for Clunkers

Letters to the Editor – August 20, 2009

August 20, 2009 // 0 Comments

Why pay for electric, fossil fuel? Dear Editor, I like the idea of the Cash for Clunkers program. The only trouble I see with this type of program is that we, the taxpayers, could do better spending $500 or less to convert the clunkers to hydrogen power. Think of how MANY more people could get money back for their cars. What is the problem with converting to hydrogen power anyway? Is it because all of our Congressmen are sitting on big oil stocks? Is that why they are not moving in the direction of hydrogen fuel? America has tried electric autos before, and they have not proven to be good for long hauls, and it’s not going to work now. Why pay for electric and fossil fuel? It has a much higher user price! Hydrogen fuel is so much cheaper! That’s the HUGE rub, that it’s cheaper, and no one can make any money off it—no one can make a big profit off hydrogen! Robert J. Plank Rockford resident Reader pleased with ruling for Servaas Dear Editor, I was waiting for someone else to comment regarding the Michigan Supreme Court’s decision to keep our judge on the bench, which was great! Nobody wrote, so I guess I’ll put my two-cents in, even though it wasn’t all that long ago that you printed another of my Letters to the Editor. (Thank you for that.) I am very pleased that the higher court saw reason and ruled in Judge Servaas’ favor. I heard that he wasn’t happy with the sanction levied, but justice has its rewards. Now Mr. Fischer, the one who attacked him very unfairly, is in the hot seat. As my dad would say: “Put that in your pipe and smoke it!” (regarding Mr. Fischer). Mary Beth Eggleston Rockford resident

The Tax Attic – July 9, 2009

July 9, 2009 // 0 Comments

Cash for Clunkers Our Congress is at it again. Passing laws and printing money seem to be their specialty these days. This particular program only has a one billion price tag, so it’s kind of small potatoes, but it’s still one BILLION dollars. I’m talking about the bill recently passed by both the House and the Senate, and is now awaiting President Obama’s signature:  HR 2346. It is officially titled as the “Consumer Assistance to Recycle and Save Act of 2009.” Unofficially, HR 2346 is known as the “Cash for Clunkers” program. Basically, taxpayers can trade in a clunker on a new vehicle and get a credit from the federal government for a part of the purchase. The credit will only apply to purchases or qualifying leases that occur between July 1, 2009 and November 1, 2009, and Congress has only authorized up to one billion dollars worth of credits. It’s a first-come, first-served type of program. In order to qualify for the credit, the vehicle traded in must meet four qualifications: 1.     The clunker must be in drivable condition. 2.    The clunker must have been registered and insured by the owner for at least one year immediately prior to the trade- in-         no going out and buying a $100 clunker on Monday and trading it in on Tuesday. 3.    The clunker must have been manufactured less than 25 years before the date of the trade-in-no trading in that 1980                Ford Maverick that has been sitting in the back field for the last 18 years. 4.   For automobiles, the clunker must get 18 miles per gallon or less of fuel economy. Once the clunker rules have been met, there are three qualifications the new vehicle must meet: 1.   The new vehicle must have a title that has not been transferred to any person previously, and the purchaser must be the         ultimate purchaser. In other words, it must be new and right off the assembly line. 2.   The new vehicle must have a manufacturer’s suggested retail price of $45,000 or less. 3.   The new vehicle must meet certain miles-per-gallon (mpg) requirements-22 mpg for passenger […]