Greenville Michigan

Metro Health Expands Heart & Vascular Practice in Greenville

July 30, 2015 // 0 Comments

In response to increased demand from patients, Metro Health is expanding its award-winning Heart & Vascular practice in Greenville. Metro Heart & Vascular is located at 1915 W. Washington St. in Greenville. The practice is open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday and will soon be expanding service hours. The development has more than doubled the size of the practice, which expanded from 2,300 square feet to 6,000 square feet. The expansion has also more than doubled the number of exam rooms, growing from three to eight. The practice offers consultative visits, nuclear cardiology, vascular ultrasound, echocardiography, stress testing and other services, as well as provides clinics for hypertension, Coumadin and device checks. Metro Heart & Vascular is growing rapidly in Greenville, said Mike Faas, president and CEO of Metro Health. Expanding the practice and our range of service will allow our physicians to continue to meet the needs of our patients. Metro Heart & Vascular opened in 2009. The practice currently includes eight cardiologists and is adding two additional cardiologists this month. The practice provides services at its main office inside Metro Health Hospital as well as in satellite offices in downtown Grand Rapids, Greenville, Sheridan, Holland and Allegan. The Greenville office is staffed by Dr. Paul Kovack, Dr. John Key and Paul Albright, P.A., as well as nurses and office staff. The team sees general cardiology patients as well as those struggling with vascular disease such as peripheral arterial disease, or PAD. PAD is a common circulatory problem in which narrowed arteries block the blood flow to arms and legs, causing numbness, leg pain and tissue damage and can lead to amputation. Metro Health Hospital has developed a nationally recognized specialty in the treatment of PAD and amputation prevention. Led by Dr. Jihad Mustapha, Metro Heart & Vascular physicians utilize leading-edge technology to clear blockages and restore circulation in even the most challenging of cases. The practice regularly attracts patients from around Michigan, across the U.S. and around the world

ATF investigating Nelson’s Speed Shop fire

July 5, 2012 // 0 Comments

The National Response Team (NRT) of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) has been activated by request from the Michigan State Police to investigate a fire at Nelson’s Speed Shop, 4566 South Greenville Road, in Greenville. A fire was reported to the Montcalm Township Fire Department Friday, June 22, at approximately 1:30 a.m. Montcalm Fire reported heavy flames through the roof of the structure upon arrival. The Greenville Daily News reported that 11 fire departments and about 75 firefighters fought the blaze and cleared the scene 10-12 hours later. The fire reportedly started in the back of the business, where fuel and oil was stored. The structure and contents are a total loss. The structure occupies approximately 50,000 square feet and the total estimated loss exceeds $5,000,000. “ATF will utilize all resources available and necessary to help determine the cause of this fire,” said Acting Special Agent in Charge Arron Graves. “Our activation of the NRT speaks to the seriousness of which we hold this fire. ATF along with our partners will work tirelessly to determine the cause of this fire.” This is the 10th activation of the NRT in fiscal year 2012 and number 731 since the inception of the team in 1978. The NRT includes 20 team members and arrived on scene on Monday, June 25. ATF is investigating this fire jointly with the Michigan State Police, the Greenville Department of Public Safety, the Montcalm Township Fire Department and the Montcalm County Sheriff’s Department. In addition to ATF NRT members, ATF is utilizing special agent investigators from the ATF Grand Rapids office as well as special agents from the Detroit Field Division. Nelson’s was also destroyed in a fire in 2001. Two men were convicted of arson in that fire, and a third with having knowledge of it and failing to report it.