Health & Well Being

Healthy living begins with Health & Fitness Festival

January 14, 2010 // 0 Comments

The beginning of the new year is a time many evaluate health and fitness goals. Rockford Public Schools can help establish those goals. On Saturday, Jan. 30, Rockford Community Services (RCS) will host the third annual Health & Fitness Festival. This year’s festival is sure to be a crowd pleaser and will have something for everyone. Kids can take the “healthy challenge” and come “Dashing Through the Snow” for a competitive half-mile run/walk to see which elementary school has the most healthy participants. First place receives a trophy that can proudly be displayed at their school. Sign up online at Staff at RCS will join forces with the Rockford Education Foundation (REF) and Zumba instructor Natalie Maj for an exciting fitness fundraiser. Join Natalie and her fellow instructor from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. as they motivate the crowd with Zumba dance instruction to help raise monies for the REF and help put resources into local classrooms and promote educational opportunities. This will be an afternoon filled with music and many exciting giveaways. Michigan Blood Center will be on site for a blood drive in their mobile unit. The need for donors is constant and often urgent. Please consider donating. The drive will be going on from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. This event will have several other resources available for participants to consult healthcare professionals about medical questions, healthcare screenings, fingerprinting for the safety of the younger children, and speed and agility presentations for the serious athlete. The goal is to bring awareness to the importance of healthy living to the community. The Health & Fitness Festival will be held at North Rockford Middle School from 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Anyone interested in participating or booth information should call the RCS office at (616) 863-6322.

Add years to your life, life to your years

May 14, 2009 // 0 Comments

by SANDY STANTON ChiroHealth Rockford Everyone is talking about the mind-body link and the mind-body connection. Recent scientific discoveries have placed this phenomenon at the core of the wellness movement. Educating yourself on the mind-body connection can make a big difference in your family’s health. The Mind-The home of the mind is the brain. According to the February 1997 issue of Life Magazine, “This three-pound organ stores 100 trillion bits of information over the course of 70 years. That is equal to 500,000 sets of the Encyclopedia Britannica, which stacked, would reach 442 miles high. A fully formed brain contains 100 billion neurons, or nerve cells.” Wow! While these numbers are staggering, what’s even more impressive is how these neurons function to originate thought and supply information to the body. This is what chiropractors and other holistic health professionals refer to as “innate intelligence.” Your innate intelligence, within you, is the life energy that keeps you alive, heals you when you are sick, and enables your body to perform the extraordinary amount of work, effortlessly, that keeps you functioning at your full potential. It is important to keep your mind clear and sharp for it to be effective in the mind-body connection. The Body-The performance of your body is extraordinary. “Breathing one pint of air 17 times a minute, we take in 78 million gallons in an average life span, enough to fill the Hindenburg airship one-and-a-half times. The average person takes one billion steps in his life and walks about 77,000 miles, landing on each foot with a force triple his body weight. Eight million new red blood cells are produced in the bone marrow every second.” Amazing! What do you think will happen if you only take care of your body when it is broken? Unfortunately, there are many people who grew up with the mindset, “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” These people ignored pain and did not participate in wellness activities. They are paying heavy prices today. Just look at their posture. If people look bent over and crooked on the outside, how do you think their bodies are on the inside? Rather than commit to a wellness lifestyle, they cover up their problems with drugs and keep on going, […]

Yoga in times of crisis

May 14, 2009 // 0 Comments

by DR. JORGE RODRIGUEZ, Ph.D. Doctor in health & physical education Personal trainer/owner Many people are unrolling their yoga mats and polishing their poses to find flexibility and sanity amid the financial chaos. Last month I read an article from  New York news that said fitness experts say gym memberships are holding steady or rising and yoga classes are thriving.  What I really think is that a yoga practice becomes a refuge from the negativity of an economic recession, and the studio kind of becomes the sanctuary. Yoga uses movement and postures to strengthen the body and breathing techniques and meditation to quiet the mind. People who take yoga class, “take a break” from whatever else may be going on in their lives. And at the very most, a practice can become a transformational experience that reenergizes and rejuvenates you. These days, especially when faced with any crisis, devotees are eager to cite the tranquility they have found by regularly participating in yoga. Often, people get hurt because they assume that yoga is simple and that anybody can pretzel himself or herself on demand. At the same time, others see yoga as a practice originally conceived to help people achieve inner peace and tranquility, as a way to get a vigorous workout. More than five times as many people take yoga classes at health clubs today as did a decade ago, and enthusiasts have devised all kinds of variations found appalling to purists: hip-hop yoga, disco yoga, power yoga, not to mention other different controversial yoga branches. When some people think of yoga, they imagine having to stretch like a gymnast. That makes them worry that they’re too old, unfit, or “tight” to do yoga. The truth is it’s never too late to improve flexibility. The series of yoga poses called asanas work by safely stretching your muscles. Yoga increases the range of motion in joints. It may also increase lubrication in the joints. The outcome is a sense of ease and fluidity throughout your body. Yoga stretches not only your muscles but all of the soft tissues of your body. That includes ligaments, tendons, and the fascia sheath that surrounds your muscles. And no matter your level of yoga, you most likely will see […]

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