Spectrum Health Medical Group neurology chief to lead Epilepsy Foundation

June 9, 2011 // 0 Comments

The Epilepsy Foundation announced recently that it has elected Brien J. Smith, MD, as chair of its board of directors. Smith is chief of neurology for the Spectrum Health Medical Group. “Brien is well-respected in the medical community as a top neurologist, and his personal experience with epilepsy has fueled his passion to serve others,” said Rich Denness, president and CEO of the Epilepsy Foundation. “Under his leadership, the Foundation will become a stronger voice for people living with epilepsy, many of whom face great obstacles.” Since its founding in 1968, Smith is the first medical doctor with a history of seizures to serve as the Epilepsy Foundation’s board chair. His primary areas of interest include providing and promoting new therapies and options such as brain surgery and advanced technologies for optimal seizure control. Smith, who has a history of epilepsy related to a brain tumor, is an authority on epilepsy and co-author of the book “Epilepsy Surgery: Case Studies and Commentaries.” Smith has had a strong advocacy presence on Capitol Hill and before the Administration. He has advocated for more funding to promote a wide range of epilepsy research toward better treatment options, a greater understanding of seizures and a cure for epilepsy. Additionally, Smith has advocated on the need for greater access to all available treatment, focusing most recently on those who develop epilepsy as a result of traumatic brain injury while in military service. His testimony before Congress helped create the Veterans Administration Epilepsy Centers of Excellence to ensure early recognition and quality treatment and support for veterans with epilepsy. “I am honored that my colleagues have asked me to serve as chair of the board,” said Smith. “I am excited about this opportunity to continue making the Epilepsy Foundation a prominent presence in communities around the country, where we will provide necessary programs and services to support people affected by epilepsy, increase public understanding of the condition and continue to raise funds toward research for a cure.” Smith came to Spectrum Health in 2010 from Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, where he was both senior staff neurologist and the medical director for the Comprehensive Epilepsy Program. Smith earned his bachelor’s degree at Ferris State University in Big Rapids, Mich., and his […]

What are symptoms, treatment for influenza?

May 14, 2009 // 0 Comments

by ALANNA WIARDA, M.D. Advantage Health Physician Network Northeast Office   Influenza, commonly called the flu, is a contagious respiratory viral illness which is most commonly seen in the winter months. The flu virus is spread person-to-person via respiratory droplets produced by coughing, sneezing or talking. There are many different strains of the influenza virus, each designated with an H and N number (example strain H2N3 was common several years ago). The most recently recognized strain of influenza, the swine flu (H1N1), was first seen in Mexico in March 2009. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), 29 countries have officially reported a total of 4,379 cases of this flu strain. As of May 10, 2009, in the United States, there have been 2,532 confirmed cases in 44 states, including 114 in Michigan. As of May 7, there has been one confirmed and 38 probable cases in Kent County. Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment of the swine flu are similar to other flu strains. Symptoms of influenza infection include: fever, chills, headache, body aches, cough, sore throat and fatigue. Fever may last two to five days with flu, compared to 24-48 hours with other common upper respiratory infections. The illness typically lasts three to five days, but weakness and fatigue can persist for several weeks. A person is considered to be contagious from one day before symptoms begin until about one week later. The most common complication of the flu is pneumonia, which can be very serious in the elderly, young children and those with chronic medical problems. You should seek medical care quickly if serious symptoms develop such as shortness of breath, chest pains, uncontrolled vomiting, dehydration, confusion or convulsions. Influenza is diagnosed based on the typical symptoms occurring during an outbreak in the community or during the usual flu season. A nasal swab can be obtained to confirm this diagnosis, but is not always necessary. Treatment of flu symptoms can help to make you feel better, but will not shorten the illness. Recommendations include rest, drinking plenty of fluids to avoid dehydration, and use of over-the-counter medications such as acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Motrin) to relieve fever, headaches and muscle aches. Use of aspirin is not recommended, especially in children under 18, as this […]