Donations a simple step in breaking bonds of addiction

September 13, 2012 // 0 Comments

by BETH ALTENA A Salvation Army donation truck will be parked at Ric’s Food Center, 6767 Belding Road from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on September 22. For the third year in a row the public is invited to pull up and donate clothing, furniture electronics, appliances and household goods, receiving help unloading and a receipt for a deduction on this year’s taxes. According to Salvation Army Public Relations Director Diane Taber, people may not realize what exactly they are helping to achieve with the simple step of cleaning out no longer needed, gently used items and giving them to the Salvation Army. In addition to stocking the eight West Michigan Salvation Army stores, where customers can pick up good-as-new items for pennies on the dollar of what they originally cost, donations are literally saving lives and rebuilding souls. Taber said she herself represents what has always been the organization’s main focus: helping individuals break away from the grips of addiction and allowing them to turn their lives around. The Salvation Army focuses on their local Adult Rehabilitation Center where people who are caught up in alcoholism or drug addiction can turn to for help. “I am like a lot of people who had a good upbringing, a good family, a good education,” she described. “I didn’t have any alcoholism in my family, but I got it.” Tabor said the Salvation Army began in the late 1800s in the slums of London where William Booth was determined to bring the word of God to those who were not allowed in the doors of churches. “Those were the drunks and the prostitutes mostly,” Taber described. She said another basis of the organization was Booth’s belief that “you can’t preach to a man with a toothache,” so caring for people’s physical well-being had to be part of bringing them to faith. Even the common phrase to be “on the wagon” came from the earliest years of the Salvation Army. Taber said the organization went through the slums with horse-drawn wagons and those in need of food, clothes, caring and a spiritual second chance literally got on the wagon. The Grand Rapids Adult Rehabilitation Center is a place where people can go and either stay six months to […]

Experience local history, donate historic photos, learn about living with cemetery tour

September 13, 2012 // 0 Comments

Residents of the area who seek to better understand the community’s history will have several opportunities coming up soon. In conjunction with the Grand Rogue Living History Encampment Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 15 and 16 at the Grand Rogue Camp and Sport Resort, 6400 West River Drive, the Hyser House Museum will be open. Hyser House Museum is located adjacent to the campground at 6440 West River Drive. Visit Saturday, Sept. 16 from noon to 4:30 for craft demonstrations at the museum, an exciting addition to the historical enactments representing all periods of American history happening at the Encampment. Find demonstrations of butter churning, knitting, candle making, rag rug making, wool spinning, weaving, tatting, perhaps basket making and chair caining will take place at Hyser Museum, which was home to pioneer settler and doctor William Hyser. Another historic opportunity is offered by the Plainfield Township Historical Committee, who need help in collecting old school photographs. Anyone with an old grade school photograph is asked to allow the committee members to make a copy for historic us. In special interest are photographs from the old school districts such as Belmont, Colton, Post, Goff, Sage, D.W. Richardson, Wilson, Peach Grove, Brownell, Atwater, Comstock Park and Oakwood. Anyone with old photographs is asked to call the township hall at (616) 364-8466. Please leave your name and number or e-mail address so you can be contacted or bring photographs to the township to be scanned. Learn life lessons at Cemetery Memory Days on September 15 and 16. Township Trustee Chuck Weldon will lead a presentation and tour of the Plainfield Township Cemetery located at the corner of Packer Drive and Rogue River Drive. Meet Chuck at the north end of the cemetery at 10 a.m. on either Saturday, Sept. 15 or Sunday, Sept. 16 to learn about cemetery history.

Rockford Area Historical Society News & Update

September 13, 2012 // 0 Comments

by TERRY KONKLE President, Rockford Area Historical Society On September 6, the Rockford Area Historical Society (RAHS) had their first regular meeting of the new season with a program featuring the new museum project update. Many questions were answered and those present were informed about the areas of fundraising, renovation and museum funding in the future. The upcoming online, silent and live auctions were covered along with the plans for the scarecrow weekends. Several suggestions for the auction were considered and sign-up sheets for auction workers were passed around. Workers are needed for Friday and Saturday, Sept. 28-29. Although many indicated that they could help, we still could use more volunteers. If you could give us some of your time either or both of those days, contact us at (616) 866-0530 or (616) 485-4144. Our program director, Jan Konkle, has set the schedule for our remaining nine meetings. A program brochure is available at the museum and Rockford City Hall. They can also be requested at (616) 866-0530. Meeting dates and activities are made available each month in The Rockford Squire about two weeks before the meeting date. To give readers an idea of what is planned, let me briefly summarize our meeting times and activity. Perhaps this column could be saved, so that the entire schedule is available. All meetings are at the community cabin as follows: Oct. 4, 2012, at 7 p.m., “One Hundred Years of Rockford Football,” by Terry Konkle Nov. 1, 2012, at 7 p.m., “Rockford’s Hidden Treasures—Hidden In Plain Sight,” by Jerry DeMaagd Dec. 6, 2012, at 6:30 p.m., Christmas Potluck—Bring your own table service and a dish to pass. Jan. 3, 2013, at 1 p.m., “Different Routes to Geneology,” by Janette Konkle Feb. 7, 2013, at 1 p.m., “History of the Masons,” by John Wallstadt from the Masonic Museum March 7, 2013, at 7 p.m., “Lost On the Lady Elgin,” by Valerie van Heest April 4, 2013, at 7 p.m., “Chief Wabasis and the White Swan Community,” by Linda Critchell May 2, 2013, at 7 p.m., “History of Herman’s Boy,” by Floyd Havemeier June 6, 2013, at 6:30 p.m., Annual Potluck Picnic and Election of Officers Next week, I will catch up on the “Rockford Nuggets of History” question, […]

Food and fun fundraisers help with boy’s treatment

September 13, 2012 // 0 Comments

Rare treatment has seen success “Max Matters!” invites the public to participate in a pair of fall fundraisers that will help a local boy with a rare disorder continue treatment that is seeing continued success. Max Manciu, now age 9, has a peroxisomal disorder that is very rare and is inherited from both parents. With his disorder, his body is unable to break down fatty acids among other things, and life expectancy for those with this disorder is not long—usually death occurs in early childhood, if not before the age of one. Max has been being treated by a doctor in Spain, who treated him with a type of natural oil that is not found in the United States. His doctor passed away, however, and now the family has found a doctor in Canada to continue Max’s treatment. The family considers the results of his treatment so far to be nothing short of amazing. Max is able to walk, run and climb and is gaining his eyesight back. The family hopes to raise funds for a trust for Max’s medical costs, treatment, transportation, lodging, shipment for the oil and other costs. Motorcycle fans will appreciate the Support Max Manciu motorcycle poker run on Saturday, Sept. 22 beginning at 240 Covered Village Mall, Belding. Registration begins at 9:30 a.m. with the ride beginning at 11 a.m. The event will have silent auctions, a 50/50 raffle, food, fun and cash prizes. For information call (616) 794-9540. The Corner Bar in Rockford is holding a “Dogs for Dollars” night with 15 percent of food sales going to the Max Matters! fund. The event will be September 24 from 5 p.m. until close. Clip the coupon online at or e-mail

Friendship goes beyond boundaries of expectation

September 13, 2012 // 0 Comments

Last week’s Squire story about Julie Carr, general friend of all who really showed her true colors by creating a truly enormous bedcover for her new acquaintance Vern Criner, was missing one key thing: a picture of the quilt she crocheted. See these two pictures including the beautiful bedcover, measuring an amazing nine feet two inches by six feet ten inches, and Carr and Criner together. When Criner saw the fine work Carr creates from her Richter Place apartment, he asked what he likely expected was a modest favor. Could Carr please crochet a cover for his bed in his own apartment? Carr took him at his request and then some, using an amazing 22 skeins of yarn to craft what is nothing short of amazing for Criner’s queen-sized bed. If anyone happens to see Carr out and about—she bowls at Rockford Lanes on Thursdays, loves to drive around thrift shopping, and is generally a very active 74—be sure to tell her you saw what a helpful heart, two months of hard work and a whole lot of yarn can turn into: a bed cover like no other.

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