Births, April 30, 2009

April 30, 2009 // 0 Comments

Maggie Isabelle McCarthy Proud parents, Cullen and Jacquie McCarthy of Rockford, Michigan announce the birth of their new daughter, Maggie Isabelle McCarthy. Maggie was born on Saturday, February 28, 2009 at 4:04 p.m. at Spectrum Butterworth Hospital. She weighed 9 pounds, 9 ounces and was 21 inches long. Maggie was welcomed home by her sister, three-year-old Grace and Molly the family dog. Grandparents are Ken and Chris Gielczyk  of Rockford, Michigan and Jack and Linda McCarthy of Mount Pleasant, Michigan. Aunts and uncles are Carrie Gielczyk and Andy Gielczyk of Rockford, Katie Gielczyk of Mount Pleasant,  and John McCarthy and Jeff McKeehan of Longmont, Colorado.

Hide and go seek: Outdoor sport heats up in warm weather

April 30, 2009 // 0 Comments

by Roger Allen Have you heard about “letterboxing”? It’s an organized game of following clues to find items that other participants have hidden. It requires good walking shoes, access to the Internet, and a sense of adventure. Letterboxing began in England in 1854 and is still a popular pastime there. The idea came to Dartmoor resident James Perrott, who placed a bottle in a wild, nearly inaccessible local area. In the bottle he included his calling card so future visitors could contact him. They could also leave their own calling cards. In the past ten years or so, letterboxing has come to America and beyond, spurred by a 1998 article in the Smithsonian magazine. Participants are both hiders and finders. At the Internet site, they post their own directions (for locating small items they have hidden) as well as retrieve the clues of other hiders. Following a printed-out series of directions usually requires a fair amount of walking, often in nature areas or parks. Once the seeker finds the “treasure,” he or she uses a rubber stamp in an included logbook to announce success. The box may also contain goodies for the finders. The letterbox is then closed (think waterproof zip lock bags) and carefully replaced for the next finder. Directions to a box (called “clues” or “the map”), can be straightforward, cryptic, or any degree in between, depending on the hider’s personality and ingenuity. New technology has come to letterboxing. Today’s modern version, “geocaching,” involves a Global Positioning System (GPS) unit to help locate the hidden object. A geocacher can place a geocache anyplace in the world, pinpoint its location using GPS technology, and then share the geocache’s existence and location online. Anyone with a GPS unit can try to locate the geocache. Geocaching was imagined shortly after the removal of Selective Availability from GPS on May 1, 2000, because the improved accuracy of the system allowed for a small container to be specifically placed and located. The first documented placement of a GPS-located cache took place on May 3, 2000, by Dave Ulmer of Beavercreek, Oregon. The location was posted on the Usenet newsgroup sci.geo.satellite-nav as 45°17.460N 122°24.800W.  According to Dave Ulmer’s message, the original stash was a black plastic bucket buried […]

Crosby receives honors at Wittenberg University

April 30, 2009 // 0 Comments

Emma Crosby of Rockford was one of several students inducted into the Alpha Lambda Delta Honor Society at Wittenberg University’s annual Honors Convocation on April 17, 2009. Alpha Lambda Delta is a national honor society that seeks to recognize and encourage scholarship among first-year college women. Selection is based entirely on achieving a 3.5 cumulative grade-point average for the fall semester of their first year. Wittenberg University is located in Springfield, Ohio.

Tannery workers see little future in their profesion, hope for fairness

April 30, 2009 // 0 Comments

Harvey White, a second-generation tannery worker who himself has put in 37 years at Wolverine, stood at the annual Wolverine World Wide shareholders meeting on Thursday, April 23. Outside his co-workers were picketing for a fair settlement after losing their jobs as the tannery closed after 125 years in operation. He said the company’s CEO himself explained that 95 percent of all of America’s tanneries have closed to move operations to Asia to be close to the manufacturing. “He apologized for having to do it and seemed very sincere.” White said. “I’m not saying I’m on his side.” On the picket line, former employees were less restrained. One said she was told the tannery workers would no longer have access to Camp Wolverine, apparently a camp on the Muskegon River, or receive shoe discounts, since they did not retire from the company. Jeff Heyboer was out with former co-workers, although he will not be affected by the settlement. He was a four-year employee who crossed picket lines to take his job and now joined that line to show support. Heyboer was a supervisor who was let go with no notice last fall. He said he was shocked and near tears. “I thought that job was what I would do the rest of my life,” he said. “You looked around and saw people with 25, 30  years in and you didn’t think that job was going to go. If I had my say, I’d tell people not to buy Wolverine shoes because they are buying a Chinese product.” White hopes the settlement reflects the prospects the tannery workers face. “There is nothing out there. We are skilled tannery workers, but they shut down all the tanneries.” Heyboer noted that many of the long-timers will struggle to find new employment. “They are too young to retire, but too old to hire. Where are they going to find to work in this economy at that age? We expected to be there the rest of our lives.” White said he was assured at the meeting that a settlement will be reached within a few weeks that will be acceptable to all. He said shareholders appeared concerned to see the picketers, but many waved as they left the meeting. “I’m […]

Morel hunters, grab your mesh bags

April 30, 2009 // 0 Comments

  Did Squire Editor Beth Altena find the first morel mushroom in Rockford? This little beauty, a half-free early variety, was found in a park in the Rockford school district on Sunday, April 26. If other mushroom fans have had some luck, don’t forget to share your finds by sending us pictures and precise details as to the location of your find (just kidding). Email

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