The City of Rockford

Huntington Bank Rogue River Blues concerts begin

June 2, 2011 // 0 Comments

The City of Rockford is pleased to announce that Huntington Bank is the proud sponsor of this year’s Huntington Rogue River Blues Series. The Blues Series will once again provide the Rockford community with Tuesday evening concerts in Downtown Rockford, Garden Club Park, from 7 to 9 p.m. These family-oriented concerts provide outstanding musical talent free of charge to the public. Come early and enjoy dinner in one of Rockford’s fine eating establishments and stroll through the wonderful shops. Then bring a blanket or lawn chairs and enjoy an evening of wonderful music. Garden Club Park is located in downtown Rockford, north of the Rockford Dam on Bridge Street, directly behind the Squires Street shops. The Rogue River Blues Series schedule is as follows: • June 14—Harper • June 21—The Vincent Hayes Project • June 28—Rob Blaine’s Big Otis Blues Band • July 5—BMF Band • July 12—Root Doctor • July 19—Steve Hilger Band • July 26—Thirsty Perch Blues Band The After the Blues Series schedule is as follows: • August 2—Mind’s Eye (jazz) • August 9—Red Sea Pedestrians (world beat) • August 16—Small Town Son (country/rock) If inclement weather, the event moves to the Rotary Pavilion, which is located in downtown Rockford at the corner of Courtland and Squires streets. Parking Suggestion: South Squires Parking Lot, accessed from Bridge St. entrance drive between Vitale’s and J.T. Stitchery, or from Main St. entrance drive north of the Rogue Valley Towers building. A short, pleasant walk north on the White Pine Trail will bring you directly to the park.  

Special Olympics basketball tournaments well received

March 31, 2011 // 0 Comments

The Special Olympics State Basketball championships held in Rockford on Friday, March 19 and Saturday, March 20 brought thousands of people to Rockford and may become an annual event. Kimberly Purdy, Public Relations Director, Special Olympics Michigan commented, “The City of Rockford, Rockford Public Schools and the Heart of Rockford Business Association opened their hearts, arms and doors to the Special Olympics Michigan 2011 State Basketball Finals. We are grateful for the warm reception that our athletes, family members, coaches, chaperones and volunteers received. Our event brought more than 1,000 athletes, coaches, chaperones and volunteers from all over Michigan to Rockford. It was a very successful event thanks to the Rockford community and to the Grand Rapids Jaycees, celebrating their 30th year as host organization! Rockford students opened doors for athletes and their families. Rockford provided complimentary shuttle transportation for our athlete delegations and family members between the schools as well as to downtown. Volunteers even handed out welcome packets containing coupons, gifts and treats for those in attendance. Community members attended Opening Ceremonies and competition to show support for our athletes! We really appreciate everything that members of the Rockford community did to make our athletes and family members feel right at home.” Lois Arnold, President & CEO, Special Olympics Michigan, said, “I met the Rockford mayor and Rockford school superintendent who welcomed us warmly and graciously. Everywhere I went everyone was so friendly and welcoming. Thank you to the Rockford for community for making the State Basketball Finals so special.”   –  

City smokes up sewers and storms

April 29, 2010 // 0 Comments

If your toilet was bubbling and spitting with black smoke this week, don’t blame your uncle’s famous chili recipe. The City of Rockford has been conducting tests of the sewer lines to find leaks and unauthorized connections. Department of Public Works staff put artificial smoke devices down City sewer connections to see what results would drift up. At The Squire newspaper, the toilets burbled and smoke spewed from an exhaust pipe out of the top of the building. That was all right, DPW said. At the Michigan State Police, smoke leaked from under the roof line. Not so good. “We found a lot of things,” said City Manager Michael Young. Young said the testing was to find where clean water is entering pipes in the City’s sewer lines. The lines lead to the new PARCCside Clean Water plant for treatment. “Every drop we can stop from being treated saves money,” Young said. Water from storm drain lines—such as parking lot runoff—doesn’t need to be treated. The City was looking for things such as storm drains improperly connected to the sewer lines. Water can also enter the system through breaks in the pipes or missing manhole covers. They found all that and more. Young said a cover in a manhole in woods was off and probably has been for years. Likely a plow truck pushed snow over the cover, knocking it off. “A 24-inch hole in the ground can let in a lot of water.” The City are also found illegal connections, not necessarily on older properties. It used to be normal for contractors to connect storm drains to sewer lines, but has been a violation for years. Young said some were easy fixes, such as manhole covers that shouldn’t have had holes but did and caps that were knocked off. Smoke coming up through the grass indicated a cap underground that had been knocked off at one time and was letting water into the system. Young said the testing was mostly complete and would result in much less water being unnecessarily treated. “It was very interesting.”